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Joe Winchester

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Top Stories by Joe Winchester

The first part of this article (JDJ, Vol. 8, issue 4) introduced the Standard Widget Toolkit (SWT), and showed how graphical user interfaces can be created using some of the basic widgets found in SWT. In addition, layout classes were described that allow widgets to be arbitrarily positioned and sized within their parent. In Part 2, we continue where the previous article left off, describing some of the more advanced controls and concepts, including multithreading in the user interface. We conclude with a brief discussion of SWT graphics. Items Many of the advanced controls in SWT make use of items. Items are widgets that represent a specific kind of child within a control. They are always used in conjunction with the parent and cannot exist without the parent. For example, a menu contains menu items and a menu item cannot exist outside of a menu. Table 1 shows some... (more)

Total Eclipse

Tim'O Reilly, the eponymous publisher, kicked off EclipseCon 2005 in Burlinghame earlier this year with an excellent presentation titled "Open source business models and design patterns." As well as documenting various failures and successes in the computing world, one message that struck a chord was that to succeed in open source you must design for participation. Three days later, Lee Nackman, CTO of IBM Rational Software and one of the original thinkers behind the Eclipse project, demonstrated how this was one of the core principles built in from the ground up. It had led to t... (more)

Swing Baby, Yeah!!!

Back in 1996, Java was originally hailed as a way of making the Web more appealing through applets, and, with its "write one, run anywhere" philosophy, as the holy grail for desktop apps that would be truly cross platform. The truth is that both were oversold at the time. With the combination of low bandwidth Internet connections and early Swing releases not living up to user expectations occurring in the middle of the Microsoft vs. Sun "pure Java" fight that resulted in JVMs being pulled from Internet Explorer, Java's attention moved off the desktop and onto the server. It's no... (more)

SWT - A Native Widget Toolkit for Java Part 1 of 2

The Standard Widget Toolkit (SWT) is a Java class library that allows you to create native user interfaces. It's designed to provide efficient, portable access to the underlying facilities of the operating system on which it's implemented. SWT uses native widgets wherever possible, giving an SWT program a native look and feel and a high level of integration with the desktop. In addition, SWT includes a rich set of controls such as tree, table, and tab folder. This article introduces SWT by describing some of the basic concepts and classes. Hello World: A Simple SWT Program The e... (more)

One Size Fits No One

At a presentation a number of years ago given by Josh Bloch he made a comment that Java as a language hit the "sweet spot" of programming. His metaphor was based around the fact that the language was straightforward to learn and that rather than containing many esoteric coding constructs, writing and understanding a Java program was a relatively easy task. I think Java is at a very critical point at the moment where it is slipping away from its sweet spot and this worries me. Two things are to blame: annotations and aspects. An annotation allows a programmer to flag a part of a p... (more)