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Joe Winchester

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Top Stories by Joe Winchester

The Standard Widget Toolkit (SWT) is a Java class library that allows you to create native user interfaces. It's designed to provide efficient, portable access to the underlying facilities of the operating system on which it's implemented. SWT uses native widgets wherever possible, giving an SWT program a native look and feel and a high level of integration with the desktop. In addition, SWT includes a rich set of controls such as tree, table, and tab folder. This article introduces SWT by describing some of the basic concepts and classes. Hello World: A Simple SWT Program The easiest way to learn SWT is to study a simple example. The following code shows a complete SWT program that creates and displays a new window on the desktop with "Hello World" in the title bar. Figure 1 shows the result of running this program on Windows XP. --> 1 import org.eclipse.swt.*; 2 i... (more)

The Pragmatics Of Java Debugging

Essential to the development of complex systems are tools that help the developer locate, analyze, and fix problems. Debuggers provide support for this by letting a developer inspect the internal state of a program at runtime, as well as suspend and resume execution statement by statement. The originators of the Java programming language defined a debugging architecture, but since its conception Java has advanced into new areas of deployment topologies and optimization technologies that present a further set of problems. This article covers some of the background behind these is... (more)

i-Technology Viewpoint: Java's Not Evolving Fast Enough

A programming API represents a documented contract between a function that provides some kind of computing service and those who wish to use it. In Java, once an API is used there is a physical contract between the two that the compiler and JVM enforce. If at some point in the future the author of the API wishes to make changes, they are limited in scope; if the author renames methods or removes arguments, programs that are bound to the previous signature will no longer run. The change can be published with the new version of the class library or framework so that users can upgra... (more)

Java Developer's Journal: 'To Dwell in the Future and Forget About Today'

Some of the words I dread most in a meeting are: "What if ?" They're fine in the present tense of "What if a user tries this option?" or "What if the database read fails mid flight?", but as soon as the future tense is introduced I begin to worry. "What if the database and middleware changes?" or "What if sometime soon we don't just have to run on PCs but need to work on mobile phones?" There is also the future future tense such as "What happens to the UI if the operating system is ported to run on a wrist watch?" or "What if one day the company merges with another whose corporat... (more)

The Vision for Eclipse: An Interview with Mike Milinkovich

Mike Milinkovich, executive director of the Eclipse Foundation, has been kind enough to answer some questions for Enterprise Open Source Magazine. Rather than rattle off the usual ones about the name, about why Swing wasn't used, or how much influence IBM still has, Mike has fielded questions on some more current and topical subjects, as well as given us his insights onto the future. Thanks for taking the time to talk to us Mike. View Milinkovich on SYS-CON.TV EOSM: The Eclipse Foundation recently joined the Java Community Process. Can you tell us how this is going and what you ex... (more)