Welcome!

The Source for All Things Java

Joe Winchester

Subscribe to Joe Winchester: eMailAlertsEmail Alerts
Get Joe Winchester via: homepageHomepage mobileMobile rssRSS facebookFacebook twitterTwitter linkedinLinkedIn


Top Stories by Joe Winchester

Java serialization was initially used to support remote method invocation (RMI), allowing argument objects to be passed between two virtual machines. RMI works best when the two VMs contain compatible versions of the class being transmitted, and can reliably transmit a binary representation of the object based on its internal state. When an object is serialized, it must also serialize the objects to which its fields refer - resulting in what is commonly called an object graph of connected components. Although the transient keyword can be used to control the extent to which the serialization process penetrates the object graph, this level of control is seldom enough. Many have tried to use Java's serialization to achieve the so-called "long-term persistence" of data - where the serialized form of a Java data structure is written to a file for later use. One such area... (more)

i-Technology Viewpoint: Java's Not Evolving Fast Enough

A programming API represents a documented contract between a function that provides some kind of computing service and those who wish to use it. In Java, once an API is used there is a physical contract between the two that the compiler and JVM enforce. If at some point in the future the author of the API wishes to make changes, they are limited in scope; if the author renames methods or removes arguments, programs that are bound to the previous signature will no longer run. The change can be published with the new version of the class library or framework so that users can upgra... (more)

Joe Winchester's Java Blog: Is the AJAX Bullet Coated in Fool's Silver?

Is the AJAX Bullet Coated in Fool’s Silver? Ajax is an odd beast, because it gives a very rich user experience when compared to a traditional web page (Yakov writes wonderfully about this at http://java.sys-con.com/read/163232.htm), however apart from that it’s hard to figure out what is so great about it.  Good technology wins in the long run because of tooling (something Microsoft know and excelt at), so what is the lure of Ajax ?  I think it’s simply that it allows logic be put in one file – in your HTML (or servlet, JSP, ASP or whatever kicks out HTML)... (more)

Swing Baby, Yeah!!!

Back in 1996, Java was originally hailed as a way of making the Web more appealing through applets, and, with its "write one, run anywhere" philosophy, as the holy grail for desktop apps that would be truly cross platform. The truth is that both were oversold at the time. With the combination of low bandwidth Internet connections and early Swing releases not living up to user expectations occurring in the middle of the Microsoft vs. Sun "pure Java" fight that resulted in JVMs being pulled from Internet Explorer, Java's attention moved off the desktop and onto the server. It's no... (more)

Ship Happens! Insights From the Eclipse SWT Community

The Standard Widget Toolkit (SWT) is the GUI toolkit used by Eclipse. The same folks that worked on the Common Widget (CW) library for IBM/Smalltalk developed it, this time for Java. Now, it's maintained as part of the Eclipse Platform project and distributed under an open source license, the Eclipse Public License (EPL). One key design point of SWT is that it uses native functionality on each operating system and, at the same time, presents a common, portable API. Joe Winchester, Desktop Java Editor for Java Developer's Journal, asked Steve Northover (SWT Team Lead) recently whe... (more)